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Project Zero comes to Clearview

 Gisele Winton Sarvis

GISELE WINTON SARVIS PHOTO/SPECIAL TO THE ENTERPRISE-BULLETIN
Clearview Fire Department now has 144 smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to distribute to Clearview residents thanks to the donation of the alarms by Enbridge Gas Distribution at the Sept. 25 council meeting. On hand for the presentation was, from left, Mayor Christopher Vanderkruys, Shayne Mintz, of the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council, Clearview Fire Chief Colin Shewell and Joe Corrigan of Enbridge.

GISELE WINTON SARVIS PHOTO/SPECIAL TO THE ENTERPRISE-BULLETIN Clearview Fire Department now has 144 smoke and carbon monoxide alarms to distribute to Clearview residents thanks to the donation of the alarms by Enbridge Gas Distribution at the Sept. 25 council meeting. On hand for the presentation was, from left, Mayor Christopher Vanderkruys, Shayne Mintz, of the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire Safety Council, Clearview Fire Chief Colin Shewell and Joe Corrigan of Enbridge.

CLEARVIEW TWP. — More seniors, farmers and families with young children will be better protected from the risk of fire or carbon monoxide (CO) poisoning when the Clearview Fire Department distributes 144 new smoke and CO alarms.

The combination alarms were donated to the Clearview Fire Department by Enbridge Gas Distribution through it’s Project Zero program.

Project Zero has distributed alarms to 85 Ontario communities since 2009. This year 3,300 are being distributed to 15 municipalities for an annual investment of $100,000.

“We have proof that prevention saves lives,” said Joe Corrigan of Enbridge, who presented Clearview Fire Shewell Colin Shewell with the alarms at the Sept. 25 council meeting.

Chair of the Fire Marshal’s Public Fire and Safety Council Ross Nichols said, “It is essential that Ontarians protect themselves and their families from carbon monoxide poisoning. By installing carbon monoxide alarms in the home on every level and adjacent to sleeping areas, residents can help prevent needless tragedies.”

Chief Shewell told council that the alarms will go where they are most needed.

“We are going to focus on seniors and vulnerable populations. We also have a farm inspection program so they will be going to farm houses; also (to homes with) young couples with small children to be put in the bedrooms of children to help with their safety,” Shewell said.

CO is a toxic, odourless gas that is a byproduct of incomplete combustion of many types of common fuels. It is important that all fuel-burning equipment be properly maintained to prevent carbon monoxide buildup. Alarms are a second line of defence to protect against the dangers of CO poisoning.

giselewintonsarvis@yahoo.com

Twitter.com/GiseleSarvis  



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